PLAY Campaign

Mariners Head Athletic Trainer Rick Griffin, pitcher Mark Lowe and Second baseman Robinson Cano meet with kids from the Rainier Vista Boys & Girls Club during the PLAY event.

Mariners Head Athletic Trainer Rick Griffin, pitcher Mark Lowe and Second baseman Robinson Cano meet with kids from the Rainier Vista Boys & Girls Club during the PLAY event.

A group of kids from the Boys & Girls Club got a rare treat on Tuesday – the chance to play on the grass at Safeco Field with Robinson Canó.

The kids from Rainier Vista Boys & Girls Club and Seattle Reviving Baseball in Innercities (RBI) program were invited to take part in the annual PLAY campaign designed to help kids establish healthy exercise and eating habits early in life.

PLAY stands for Promoting a Lifetime of Activity for Youth. It’s a national public awareness campaign sponsored by the Professional Baseball Athletic Trainers Society (PBATS), the Taylor Hooton Foundation and MLB Charities.

Canó was joined by teammates Charlie Furbush, Mark Lowe, James Paxton and Chris Taylor as well as members of the Mariners training staff to deliver a message about the importance of a healthy, active lifestyle, as well as making good decisions about things such as performance enhancing drugs.

Mark Lowe, who was diagnosed with Type I diabetes in his early 20s, told the kids that he didn’t let his medical condition prevent him from achieving his dream of becoming a Major League pitcher. Lowe, who has been managing his condition for the past 10-years, told the kids that they too can overcome obstacles if they stay positive.

The kids also got some good advice about steroids and performance enhancing drugs from Brian Parker of the Taylor Hooten Foundation. Hooton was a high school baseball player in Texas who took steroids to get bigger and stronger. Parker explained to the kids that although steroids can be therapeutic if you are sick, they can also have harmful effects on young, healthy bodies. He said steroids make all your muscles grow bigger, including the heart, which is dangerous. In addition, he said, performance enhancing drugs are illegal and they’re cheating.

After the presentations, the players were joined on field by three members of the Mariners training staff, Rick Griffin, Rob Nodine and Matt Thoth, who led the kids through a series of exercises – stretches and warmups, sprints and agility drills.

3 Comments

I have a question: When they show on TV a pitchers stats there in a category called “holds”. What in the world does that denote.

Larene Graves larenegraves@gmail.com

A hold is defined as the following:
A hold (abbreviated HLD, H or HD) is awarded to a relief pitcher who meets the following three conditions:

1. Enters the game in a save situation; that is, when all of the following three conditions apply:
(a) He appears in relief (i.e., is not the starting pitcher); and
(b) He is not the winning pitcher; and
(c) He qualifies under one of the following conditions:
(i) He enters the game with a lead of no more than three runs and maintains that lead for at least one inning
(ii) He enters the game, regardless of the count, with the potential tying run either on base, or at bat, or on deck
(iii) He pitches for at least three effective innings.
2. Records at least one out
3. Leaves the game before it has ended without his team having relinquished the lead at any point and does not record a save.
The hold is not an official Major League Baseball statistic.

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